Claustrophobia & Voyeurism: The Best Confined-Space Thrillers [Podcast]

As awards season gears up, it’s easy to overlook what’s currently premiering at the box office. But January gives Be Reel a chance to examine the often bizarre and flawed genre fare Hollywood throws at the wall, as well as some of the better movies that set the table. On this episode, we search for a way through the newly released “Escape Room” and discuss two of its thrilling enclosed-space predecessors in 2002’s “Panic Room” and the 1954 classic “Rear Window.”

Read More: ‘Escape Room’ Is A Fun, Well-Crafted Thriller That Can’t Escape Ridiculous Franchise Ambitions [Review]

While these three films may seem disparate in their quality (press “play” below to find out for sure), there’s more in common between topflight Alfred Hitchcock and the modest PG-13 hit that is “Escape Room” than one might imagine.

Continue reading Claustrophobia & Voyeurism: The Best Confined-Space Thrillers [Podcast] at The Playlist.
See full article at The Playlist »

Lethal Weapon Season 3 Episode 11 Review: Dial M for Murtaugh

Lethal Weapon goes full on Rear Window this week in a lighter installment that weaves two crimes into one

This Lethal Weapon review contains spoilers.

Lethal Weapon Season 3 Episode 11

“I should have never gone on that damn vacation…”

Lethal Weapon has been on a bit of a roll lately where even episodes that spin their wheels in terms of character development still find ways to be engaging and challenging. “Dial M For Murtaugh” is almost the reverse situation where it firmly pushes everyone into new territory, but it goes about it in such a clichéd, lazy fashion. The story in this entry is incredibly weak, but it’s also one of the more entertaining, humorous installments of the season.

"Dial M for Murtaugh" begins with a cutesy in media res introduction where the episode starts with Murtaugh and Cole already in some considerably hot water while they proceed to fill
See full article at Den of Geek »

Darren Criss aiming to be youngest SAG Award winner for limited series/TV movie actor

Darren Criss aiming to be youngest SAG Award winner for limited series/TV movie actor
Darren Criss became the second youngest person to win the Best Limited Series/TV Movie Actor Emmy for “The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story” in September. He could be the third youngest to win the Golden Globe equivalent next month. And if he wins the corresponding Screen Actors Guild Award, he’d set a new benchmark as the category’s youngest winner ever.

Criss, who will be nine days shy of his 32nd birthday at the Jan. 27 ceremony, wouldn’t just break the record; he’d smash it. No one has won that category while in their 30s. The youngest champ is Gary Sinise, who was 40 when he prevailed for “Truman” at the second SAG Awards in 1996; he won a second one two years later for “George Wallace,” so he occupies two of the top four youngest spots. Reigning champ Alexander Skarsgard (“Big Little Lies”), at 41 years and 149 days,
See full article at Gold Derby »

Review: Number 37, South African Thriller Holds Surprises Around Every Corner

Many films either overtly or covertly play homage to other films. And it certainly takes a lot of courage to make a film that is an overt homage to a film as iconic as Rear Window. But then, South African director Nosipho Dumisa is no ordinary filmmaker, and her feature debut Number 37 is no ordinary film. Adapting her own short crime thriller is no small, and she has gifted us with a taut, exciting story, with a distinctly South African bent and adaptation of the story to her own culture and understanding, in what is one of the most exciting genre debuts in recent years. After what should have been the perfect score for much-needed cash goes awry, Randal (Irshaad Ally) is now a parapalegic,...

[Read the whole post on screenanarchy.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

Criterion Collection: Sisters (1973) | Blu-ray Review

“What the Devil hath joined together, let no man cast asunder,” reads the gleefully blasphemous tagline of Brian De Palma’s 1973 horror film Sisters, the auteur’s first foray into his obsessive Hitchcockian homage landscapes as well as his breakthrough film (which was his seventh directorial effort). An early entry in the Criterion canon finally resurrected for Blu-ray, it stars a pre-Lois Lane Margot Kidder as a pair of French-Canadian Siamese twins whose physical separation causes significant psychological and physical distress. Although clearly modeled after key tenets from Vertigo and Rear Window (and features a Bernard Herrmann score rivaling the hysteric depths of his infamous Psycho overture), De Palma’s title also pre-dates the delicious body horror which came to characterize Cronenberg and even inspired a failed 2006 American indie remake (starring Lou Doillon and Chloe Sevigny as the juxtaposed women).…
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

Alfred Hitchcock’s ‘Rear Window’ Has Been Remade as a South African Political Thriller

  • Indiewire
In “Number 37,” South African writer-director Nosipho Dumisa takes the basic set-up of one of her favorite films, Alfred Hitchcock’s “Rear Window,” and gives the scenario a fresh setting: the poverty-stricken, crime-ridden region of a Cape Town enclave, far removed from the original movie’s upscale Greenwich Village locale. The result is the impressive debut feature “Number 37″ — a grittier spin on the voyeuristic thriller, anchored by a strong performance by star Irshaad Ally, as well as a socially relevant message.

A devourer of cinema from childhood, Dumisa grew up in a small town not unlike the setting of her film, and never imagined a career as a filmmaker. “We’ve had universities that offered media courses and so forth, but actual film schools are still a relatively new concept in South Africa, maybe 20 years old,” Dumisa said. “So I never really conceived of an idea of an industry behind the making of films.
See full article at Indiewire »

Grace Kelly movies: All 11 of her films, ranked worst to best, include ‘The Country Girl,’ ‘Rear Window,’ ‘High Noon’

  • Gold Derby
Grace Kelly movies: All 11 of her films, ranked worst to best, include ‘The Country Girl,’ ‘Rear Window,’ ‘High Noon’
Grace Kelly would’ve celebrated her 89th birthday on November 12, 2018. The Oscar-winning actress made just a handful of movies before transforming from a Hollywood princess into a real life one following her marriage to Prince Rainier of Monaco in 1956. In honor of her birthday, let’s take a look back in the photo gallery above of all 11 of her films, ranked worst to best.

Kelly got her start performing onstage and in television before being drafted by Hollywood to appear in Henry Hathaway‘s ripped-from-the-headlines nail-biter “Fourteen Hours” (1951) when she was just 22-years-old. The next year found her starring as the concerned wife to an imperiled town marshal (Gary Cooper) in the landmark western “High Noon” (1952).

She got her first Oscar nomination as Best Supporting Actress for John Ford‘s adventure yarn “Mogambo” (1953), playing one of two love interests (along with Ava Gardner) to big game hunter Clark Gable. The next year,
See full article at Gold Derby »

Grace Kelly movies: All 11 of her films ranked worst to best

  • Gold Derby
Grace Kelly movies: All 11 of her films ranked worst to best
Grace Kelly would’ve celebrated her 89th birthday on November 12, 2018. The Oscar-winning actress made just a handful of movies before transforming from a Hollywood princess into a real life one following her marriage to Prince Rainier of Monaco in 1956. In honor of her birthday, let’s take a look back in the photo gallery above of all 11 of her films, ranked worst to best.

Kelly got her start performing onstage and in television before being drafted by Hollywood to appear in Henry Hathaway‘s ripped-from-the-headlines nail-biter “Fourteen Hours” (1951) when she was just 22-years-old. The next year found her starring as the concerned wife to an imperiled town marshal (Gary Cooper) in Fred Zinnemann‘s landmark western “High Noon” (1952).

She got her first Oscar nomination as Best Supporting Actress for John Ford‘s adventure yarn “Mogambo” (1953), playing one of two love interests (along with Ava Gardner) to big game hunter Clark Gable.
See full article at Gold Derby »

Suspense thriller Number 37 gets a poster and trailer

Dark Star Pictures has released a poster and trailer for the award-winning suspense thriller Number 37, director Nospiho Dumia’s gritty homage to Alfred Hitchcock’s Rear Window, which focuses on the residents of a block of apartments in the down-and-out Cape Flats neighborhood of Cape Town which, with its petty thugs, crooked cops, violent loan sharks, and troubled pastors, soon reveals itself to be a very different place from Hitchcock’s Greenwich Village of 1954.

Set in a rough section of Cape Town, Number 37 follows Randal Hendricks, a small-time crook who becomes wheelchair-bound in a drug deal gone wrong, and his hard-working girlfriend Pam Ismael. To distract Randal during his homebound days of limited mobility, Pam gives him a pair of binoculars. While idly surveying his block, he accidentally witnesses a dirty cop being executed by his gangster neighbor Lawyer. With a loan shark breathing down his neck, Randal decides to blackmail Lawyer,
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Fright Night

Why does Fright Night, the 1985 vampire teen horror-comedy curio, endure as a great movie long past its expected sell-by date? Because writer/director Tom Holland’s Fright Night extends its core subject matter, vampiric transformation, into a studied allegory for the painful, violent uncertainty of adolescence. And because it unflinchingly tackles the two underlying themes at the core of the best horror fodder: sex and death. In the spirit of Halloween, this writer wanted to tackle one of his favorite ’80s creature features. So welcome to the first Tfh review of Fright Night… for real.

Let’s quickly cover the pitch. Devout teen cinephile Charley Brewster (William Ragsdale), his girlfriend Amy (Amanda Bearse) and their odd-duck third wheel high school colleague “Evil” Ed (Stephen Geoffreys) all tackle severe self-doubt, that most teenage of impulses, as they combat Charley’s new next-door neighbor, the elegant, supremely confident apple aficionado Jerry Dandrige
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

‘The Guilty’ Film Review: Denmark’s Oscar Entry Spins Breathless Suspense

  • The Wrap
‘The Guilty’ Film Review: Denmark’s Oscar Entry Spins Breathless Suspense
The Danish thriller “The Guilty” is certainly not the first film with a protagonist trapped in a single location: Hitchcock did variations on the theme in “Rear Window,” “Rope” and “Lifeboat,” and more recently, characters have been stuck in a phone booth (“Phone Booth”), a grave (“Buried”) and a car (“Locke”).

But with Denmark’s 2018 Oscar entry “The Guilty,” first-time feature director Gustav Möller has created a crafty cinematic experiment that, for the most part, succeeds on its own terms.

Set in an enclosed room with essentially one actor, and made up entirely of phone conversations, the film employs a full toolbox of cinematic techniques to fashion a complex character study. Lighting, camera angles, production design, editing, and sound effects all conspire to build a mood and contribute to the claustrophobia.

Also Read: Magnolia Picks Up Danish Thriller 'The Guilty'

Asger Holm (Jakob Cedergren) is an irritable narcotics
See full article at The Wrap »

Former ‘Roseanne’ writer on ‘The Conners’ killing off the Roseanne character: ‘I thought they handled it really well’

  • Gold Derby
Former ‘Roseanne’ writer on ‘The Conners’ killing off the Roseanne character: ‘I thought they handled it really well’
Danny Zuker, a former writer on “Roseanne” and current producer on “Modern Family,” just told CNN’s Brooke Baldwin that he’s pleased with how ABC killed off Roseanne Barr‘s character during Tuesday’s series premiere of “The Connors” spinoff. “I thought they handled it really well,” he said the morning after the episode aired that served as a cautionary tale about America’s reliance on opioids. “I’m happy to see them do well. I really liked the episode last night.”

SEEYour first look at ‘The Conners’ cast without Roseanne Barr [Photo]

Because of Barr’s racist tweets last May, ABC canceled “Roseanne” despite it being a ratings behemoth. Soon after, they announced the creation of “The Connors,” which would continue the story of America’s favorite family only without their controversial matriarch. That “Roseanne” revival received two nominations at the 2018 Emmys: Best Comedy Supporting Actress for Laurie Metcalf
See full article at Gold Derby »

Shudder Has More Horror Than Anyone Else

The horror streaming service Shudder ” is bringing Halloween to an unprecedented level this year with a killer lineup of seven original and exclusive films that starts with the breakout movie Revenge and culminates with the shocking slasher Summer Of 84,” said Shudder General Manager Craig Engler. “We’re also premiering the hit U.K. series True Horror, launching season 3 of Channel Zero and bringing back amazing classics like John Carpenter’s Halloween and a massive Hitchcock collection.”

The season begins with Shudder’s Vengeance Is Hers collection on September 10. Hell hath no fury like a woman scorned, and the femme fatales of these films are no exception. Headlining the collection is Revenge, a Shudder Original that delivers a razor-sharp feminist subversion of the revenge-thriller, available starting September 13.

Weekly new releases continue with Hell House LLC II: The Abaddon Hotel on September 20, Channel Zero: No-end House on September 27, Satan’S
See full article at Age of the Nerd »

Shudder’s October 2018 Releases Include Summer Of 84, Satan’S Slaves, and Tobe Hooper’s The Texas Chain Saw Massacre

  • DailyDead
Halloween may not be until October 31st, but the streaming service Shudder is already celebrating with weekly releases of a wide range of horror movies both old and new, and their upcoming October slate includes Summer of 84, Satan's Slaves, John Carpenter's Halloween, and Tobe Hooper's The Texas Chain Saw Massacre.

Press Release: "Shudder is all you need to get your fill of frights this Halloween season. With a new scary movie premiering every week, the leading premium streaming service for thriller, suspense, and horror kicks off the fun beginning September 10 and running through Halloween.

“We’re taking Halloween to an unprecedented level this year with a killer lineup of seven original and exclusive films that starts with the breakout movie Revenge and culminates with the shocking slasher Summer Of 84,” said Shudder General Manager Craig Engler. “We’re also premiering the hit U.K. series True Horror,
See full article at DailyDead »

Taiwanese Season in Kino Lumière Presents Dark Comedies, Romances as well as Legendary Martial Arts Films

On Thursday, 6 September 2018, Kino Lumière in Bratislava screens the first of the eleven films included in the Programme Cycle “Taiwanese Season“ that brings Taiwanese films spanning from the 1960s till today. The screenings will include introductions and are scheduled for Tuesdays and Thursdays at 6.15 Pm, with the last film programmed for 18 October.

“Taiwanese cinema offers many works by recognized film-makers as well as artistically influential films, many of which are not known to Slovak audience,” says Kristína Aschenbrennerová of the Slovak Film Institute, Curator of Taiwanese Season. “Our intention is to present Taiwanese films as a part of Taiwanese cultural identity, as well as an integral part of the popular entertainment. That is also why the line-up of Taiwanese Season spreads over different decades and genres and lists art house films, social realist ʻblack filmsʻ and wuxia films alongside romantic films or socially critical films from the 1960s until today.
See full article at AsianMoviePulse »

Drive-In Dust Offs: Eyes Of A Stranger (1981)

Any slasher worth its salt should have a little bit of unique flavor; or at the very least, come at the material from a slightly different angle. Such is the case with Ken Wiederhorn’s (far and away) best film, Eyes of a Stranger (1981), a taut thriller and an effective big screen debut for Jennifer Jason Leigh.

Released by Warner Bros. in late March and produced by the Friday the 13th folks, Eyes barely made back its $800,000 budget, and was frowned upon by critics as just another link in a never-ending chain of misogyny and bloodletting. Eyes however, while adhering to many of the tropes of the time, gives a sense of agency to its female leads that wasn’t completely uncommon to the genre yet always refreshing to see.

Our film opens as a photographer comes across a woman, naked and dead, submerged on the shore of a Florida swamp.
See full article at DailyDead »

Summer of 84 Review: Feel Good Nostalgia Meets Brutal Horror

Summer of 84 Review: Feel Good Nostalgia Meets Brutal Horror
A comparison to Stranger Things simply can't be avoided. Whether by design or by shared intuition, Summer of 84 taps into that same surging wave of 1980s-era nostalgia that propelled Netflix's megahit horror/sci-fi series into the forefront of popular consciousness. They share pages from the same playbook: Steven Spielberg allusions, Easter Eggs aplenty, a throbbing retro synth soundtrack, a commitment to historical accuracy, and references that only those of us who actually lived through the 1980s will recognize. But Stanger Things didn't invent theses tropes; series masterminds Matt and Ross Duffer simply excelled at pushing all the right buttons in an undeniably pleasing combination.

And now horror-centric and mainstream entertainment-seekers alike are hooked on that syrupy sweet concoction, illustrated by the success of 2017's It, which was updated to take place in the 1980s. Now, a recognizable trend has studios seeing dollar signs, and Summer of 84 will
See full article at MovieWeb »

Alfred Hitchcock movies: 25 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘Vertigo,’ ‘Psycho,’ ‘North by Northwest’

  • Gold Derby
Alfred Hitchcock movies: 25 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘Vertigo,’ ‘Psycho,’ ‘North by Northwest’
Alfred Hitchcock celebrates his 119th birthday on August 13. Born in 1899, the director has long been revered as one of the most influential filmmakers of all time. He also holds the unfortunate distinction of being one of Oscar’s biggest losers, with five Best Director nominations and no wins. Still, who needs an Oscar when you’ve impacted world cinema as significantly as “Hitch” has? In honor of his birthday, let’s take a look back at 25 of his greatest films, ranked from worst to best.

Known as “the Master of Suspense,” Hitchcock cut his teeth directing silent movies in his native England. With films like “The Lodger” (1927), he gained a reputation for helming tense and stylish psychological thrillers. With the invention of sound came an added element to Hitchcock’s work: a sly sense of humor.

He moved to America in 1940 to direct two films that earned Best Picture nominations: “Foreign Correspondent” and “Rebecca,
See full article at Gold Derby »

Alfred Hitchcock movies: 25 greatest films ranked from worst to best

  • Gold Derby
Alfred Hitchcock movies: 25 greatest films ranked from worst to best
Alfred Hitchcock celebrates his 119th birthday on August 13. Born in 1899, the director has long been revered as one of the most influential filmmakers of all time. He also holds the unfortunate distinction of being one of Oscar’s biggest losers, with five Best Director nominations and no wins. Still, who needs an Oscar when you’ve impacted world cinema as significantly as “Hitch” has? In honor of his birthday, let’s take a look back at 25 of his greatest films, ranked from worst to best.

Known as “the Master of Suspense,” Hitchcock cut his teeth directing silent movies in his native England. With films like “The Lodger” (1927), he gained a reputation for helming tense and stylish psychological thrillers. With the invention of sound came an added element to Hitchcock’s work: a sly sense of humor.

He moved to America in 1940 to direct two films that earned Best Picture nominations: “Foreign Correspondent” and “Rebecca,
See full article at Gold Derby »

Review: Summer Of '84 Has An Interesting Dialogue With The 'Burbs

Be it in big cities or small towns, people have spied on their neighbours, and assumed the worst about them, since we traded a nomadic hunter-gatherer society for permanent houses. It was, however, Alfred Hitchcock (and screenwriter John Michael Hayes) who cemented the fine cinematic tradition of snooping on adjacent residents and the suspicion of murder. 1954's New York City set suspense thriller Rear Window saw a housebound photographer with a broken leg, too much time on his hands and a good set of camera lenses peering into windows and assuming the worst. A few decades later, at the tail end of Regan-era conformity, Joe Dante (and screenwriter Dana Olsen) completely re-imagined the concept to comedic effect on the fertile satirical ground of the suburbs. The...

[Read the whole post on screenanarchy.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »
An error has occured. Please try again.

See also

Showtimes | External Sites


Recently Viewed

 
Melanie Barcelo | Pot de toilette fauteuil chaise musical pour bébé enfant thème | 01.07 조나단 Jonathan.2018.720p 1080p.BluRay.H264.AAC RARBG